POLITICS

Exploring The Struggles Of Supporting Democracy
POLITICS

Exploring The Struggles Of Supporting Democracy

Supporting ‘democracy’ is hard for many who feel government and the economy are failing them. Americans, it seems, can both value the idea of democracy and not support it in practice. Since 2016, academics and journalists have expressed concerns that formerly secure democracies are becoming less democratic. Different measures of democracy, such as scores produced by the Economist Intelligence Unit, Freedom House and the Varieties of Democracy Institute, have suggested as much based on data over the past decade. The surveys have sounded alarms about the future of democratic governance in places such as the U.S., which the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance listed as “backsliding” since 2019. A number of countries that were once considered stable democraci...
The Impact Of Banning Medical Debt From Credit Reports
POLITICS, TOP FOUR

The Impact Of Banning Medical Debt From Credit Reports

New Biden administration rule would ban medical debt from credit reports. Vice President Kamala Harris on Tuesday announced a new effort to ban medical debt from credit reports, something that would ease a burden that falls most heavily on women and Black people. “Medical debt makes it more difficult for millions of Americans to be approved for a car loan, a home loan or a small business loan, all of which in turn makes it more difficult to just get by, much less get ahead, and that is simply not fair. Especially when we know that people with medical debt are no less likely to repay a loan than those without medical debt,” Harris said. “No one should be denied access to economic opportunity simply because they experienced a medical emergency.” Federal efforts to remove medical debt fr...
More Now Than In The Past The Supreme Court Ethics Questions Are Common
POLITICS, TOP FOUR

More Now Than In The Past The Supreme Court Ethics Questions Are Common

5 reasons Supreme Court ethics questions are more common now than in the past. In recent years, all nine sitting justices on the U.S. Supreme Court have been the subject of reports calling their ethics into question. Is this an old problem? Something new? Political gamesmanship? Something more serious? As a legal scholar who has studied judicial history, politics and ethics, my answer to each of these questions is “yes.” On the one hand, accusing a Supreme Court justice of ethical misconduct is not new. In 1804, Justice Samuel Chase was impeached by the House of Representatives, but acquitted by the Senate, for violating his oath to act “faithfully and impartially” in several cases, including one where he announced his legal opinion before the defendant was heard, and another, wher...
Trump Found Guilty On All 34 Counts
POLITICS, TOP FOUR

Trump Found Guilty On All 34 Counts

Trump found guilty: 5 key aspects of the trial explained by a law professor. After the May 30, 2024, conviction of former President Donald Trump on 34 felony counts of falsifying business records in New York, what comes next? Trump’s legal team will likely appeal the verdict. “We will fight for our Constitution,” Trump said following the jury’s announcement. “This is long from over.” A sentencing hearing for Trump is set for July 11. The Conversation U.S.‘ politics and society editor Amy Lieberman spoke with Gabriel J. Chin, a scholar of criminal law and procedure, to better understand the verdict. 1. Why were there so many different felony counts in this case? The essence of the offenses Trump was convicted of is falsifying documents or records. Accordingly, each check, invoice o...
A Closer Look At Trump’s Trial And The Threats To Women
POLITICS

A Closer Look At Trump’s Trial And The Threats To Women

Trump’s trial is already putting a spotlight on threats to women. Just two days after Juror No. 2 had been selected to sit on the jury of one of the most high-profile trials in modern history, she wanted off. If the woman’s phone and the incoming messages from family, friends and co-workers were any indication, people had figured out that she was set to weigh in on the first criminal trial of a former U.S. president — a president who regularly attacks people he views unfavorably, spurring his many followers to do the same. Before being excused, Juror No. 2 told the presiding judge: “I definitely have concerns now, one of them especially being the aspects of my identity have already been out there in public. … I don’t believe, at this point, I can be fair and unbiased.” With the sta...
Trump’s Courtroom Machinations For Political Benefit
POLITICS, TOP FOUR

Trump’s Courtroom Machinations For Political Benefit

How Trump is using courtroom machinations to his political advantage. The second week is wrapping up in former President Donald Trump’s first criminal trial on charges from the state of New York related to paying hush money to an adult film star. So far, the jury has been selected, but no other proceedings have begun. The Conversation U.S. interviewed Tim Bakken, a former New York prosecutor and now a legal scholar teaching at West Point, and Karrin Vasby Anderson, a political communication expert at Colorado State University, to find out what overarching themes they have observed, both in the courtroom and outside it. Is this trial proceeding normally? Bakken: It seems like an ordinary trial, but it is an extraordinary trial underneath if we really look at some of the details. T...
Would Trump Be The First Presidential Candidate To Campaign From A Prison Cell? Nope Meet Eugene V Debs
POLITICS, TOP FOUR

Would Trump Be The First Presidential Candidate To Campaign From A Prison Cell? Nope Meet Eugene V Debs

Trump wouldn’t be the first presidential candidate to campaign from a prison cell. The first trial ever of a former president, the so-called “hush money” case against former president and likely GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump, is scheduled to begin with jury selection in New York on March 25, 2024, though that may be delayed by a month. Trump faces 34 felony charges related to alleged crimes involving bookkeeping on a payment to an adult film actress during the 2016 presidential campaign. Trump is unlikely to wind up in an orange jumpsuit, at least not on this indictment, and probably not before November 2024, in any case. Yet if he does, he would not be the first candidate to run for the White House from the Big House. In the election of 1920, Eugene V. Debs, the Socialist Party...
What To Watch Out For In The Reelection Campaign: What You Need To Know
POLITICS, TOP FOUR

What To Watch Out For In The Reelection Campaign: What You Need To Know

Trump nearly derailed democracy once − here’s what to watch out for in reelection campaign. Elections are the bedrock of democracy, essential for choosing representatives and holding them accountable. The U.S. is a flawed democracy. The Electoral College and the Senate make voters in less populous states far more influential than those in the more populous: Wyoming residents have almost four times the voting power of Californians. Ever since the Civil War, however, reforms have sought to remedy other flaws, ensuring that citizenship’s full benefits, including the right to vote, were provided to formerly enslaved people, women and Native Americans; establishing the constitutional standard of one person, one vote; and eliminating barriers to voting through the 1965 Voting Rights Act. But...
The Abuse Of Diane Abbott
POLITICS

The Abuse Of Diane Abbott

The abuse of Diane Abbott by a top Tory donor should have us all thinking about how we normalise racism against women MPs. Yet again a black woman in British public life has been subjected to racist and sexist abuse. This may be shocking, but it is not surprising. When Tory donor Frank Hester said that looking at Diane Abbott “makes you want to hate all black women” his comments were extreme. Yet they were hardly out of the ordinary. Likewise, the reluctance of some parliamentary colleagues to address the racial and gendered nature of the comments is sadly unsurprising, as was the slowness with which the prime minister responded, only belatedly and after pressure from ministers, admitting the remarks were racist. Whether you love or loathe Abbott (who has been suspended from the parli...
A World In Which Corporations Controlled All Information — Norman Jewison’s ‘Rollerball’ — Is This Vision Becoming Reality?
POLITICS, VIDEO REELS

A World In Which Corporations Controlled All Information — Norman Jewison’s ‘Rollerball’ — Is This Vision Becoming Reality?

Norman Jewison’s ‘Rollerball’ depicted a world in which corporations controlled all information – is this dystopian vision becoming reality? If the films of Norman Jewison, who died on Jan. 22, 2024, had a unifying theme, it was how his characters searched for meaning and questioned the rules of their worlds. No matter the genre of the scores of films he directed – from “In the Heat of the Night” to “Fiddler on the Roof” – his characters grew by confronting their own biases and preconceptions, even if it meant sacrificing things they once held dear. And as a media scholar, I see the Canadian director’s 1975 film “Rollerball” as one of his most underrated works. In it, the film’s hero, Jonathan E., is a star athlete who’s willing to risk his own life to avoid being a pawn for his corporate...